The problem of objectivity as arising from a less certain principle

Descartes points out that he is certain that he, a thinker, exists. Russell claims that Descartes could be more certain that thought exists. St. Thomas points out something more certain than either of these: something exists. In this most certain of statements, there is no possibility of limiting the object of our knowledge to something contained in the knowing subject, or in viewing the distinction between subject and object as being a primary and irreducible distinction- for “something” or “being” precinds from, and transcends the distinction between subject and object. If the philosophy that calls itself modern were to truly reduce itself to what is most certain, it would see that the “problem of obectivity” is only a problem if we fail to reduce our knowledge to what is most known to us.

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