Words and Transcendence

When I say “a rose” I can mean both the thing I’m looking at now, and a sort of thing. And so the particular thing is the same as a sort of thing.

The particular is also different from the sort of thing. All roses don’t grow when mine grows, nor do all roses die when mine dies.

When we say, “the man forms a word”: we imply that the mind illuminates the particular, allowing us to see it as a sort of thing. This whatness that we know is both truly and fully in the particular, and yet it is not limited to the particular. This property is called “transcendence”.

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