Notes on the Commentary on Divine Names- UPDATED

-A certain humility is necessary to accept revelation, for so long as one holds that they are the greatest mind in the universe, revelation is impossible. This is true regardless of whether one holds it as a speculative matter (no mind is greater than our own) or as a practical or quasi-moral matter (if one holds that revelation, if given, can only be such that it engenders knowledge in us of the things revealed, as opposed to faith.)

-The mind simply cannot assimilate the highest revelations to itself by its means of knowing in this life. Imagiation and sensation are a veil that we forever are throwing over what is most intelligible. Mind cannot fashion the truth of the highest revelations out of the things of imagination and sense which it carries along with itself.

But for all this, it would not befits the divine goodness not to remain closed in himself. This is true simply from the fact of creation as such. Creation is a certain refusal to remain wholly within oneself; it is a decision to draw another into a shared life out of one’s own goodness.

About these ads

7 Comments

  1. August 29, 2008 at 2:50 pm

    … it would not befit the divine goodness to remain closed in himself. This is true simply from the fact of creation as such. Creation is a certain refusal to remain wholly within oneself; it is a decision to draw another into a shared life out of one’s own goodness.

    Hmmm…consider this.

    Best,
    Mike

  2. a thomist said,

    August 29, 2008 at 3:41 pm

    The link isn’t coming up.

    As I re-read that line, I’m not crazy about the word “refusal”, and I see why I put the word “certain” in front of it. I certainly would never imply that God gained some perfection by creating, or was any better off for creating, even considering the Incarnation of the Lord. If I had that line again, I would cut everything before the semicolon. The part after the semicolon is more what I wanted to say, and it is an adapted quotation from St. Thomas, cf. ST I, q 50, a 1 c.

  3. August 29, 2008 at 4:40 pm

    What comes up when you click the link?

  4. a thomist said,

    August 29, 2008 at 5:30 pm

    An add for google documents.

  5. August 30, 2008 at 2:56 am

    Well, the document I’m linking you to IS a Google document: an article I published in The Thomist. If you click, they might ask you to log in.

    Best,
    Mike

  6. a thomist said,

    August 30, 2008 at 4:32 am

    Is the updated version better? I made a small but pretty drastic change in the wording. As an embarrassing side-note, I even wrote a post a few weeks back about the reason why the old version of the post was wrong (would not have befitted to vs. it befitted not to)

    What’s the name of the Thomist article? I don’t know why their asking for a log-on. Any other good thomist articles on there?

  7. a thomist said,

    August 30, 2008 at 8:45 am

    Got it. I read the article again, although I had read it a few years ago already independently.

    I agree with your conclusion. In the passage in the post, I wanted only to give a reason for creation, but you’re right that such a reason is not such that a failure to create would have been unreasonable. We could even go further and say that it is analytic that the unmoved mover has no motives. But we can still avoid the dead-end of thinking that creation is therefore simply random in the sense of being irrational, and irrational in the sense of being repugnant and ugly to a well-formed mind, and well formed in the sense of ordered to the Creator.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 159 other followers

%d bloggers like this: